Dream Australia

TV Series

Anelia Blackie (Limestone Coast Region) and Kuol and Mel Baak Stories

In the 1970s, Anelia’s father could see the writing on the wall. He knew that the escalating violence in South Africa would have implications for his family. However, the children weren’t interested as they were about to spread their wings and leave the family nest.

It was only after Anelia’s father passed away that they realised his prediction was coming true.
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Murraylands / Riverland Region

The region’s diverse multi-cultural community includes people from India, the Philippines, China, the U.K., Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Bhutan and the Sudan. Most have been attracted to this region through Australia’s Skilled Migration program.

The major areas of employment in the region include;
Agriculture 19.2%
Health Care & Social Assistance 12.7%
Manufacturing 9.6%
Retail 9%
Education & Training 7.4%
Construction 5.7%

Currently, there is a demand for skilled workers in a range of industries including intensive animal production, horticulture and manufacturing as well as opportunities in the provision of professional services.
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Migration Advice

People from nearly every continent have migrated to Australia to begin what, for them, was a new and better life. Their hopes and ambitions came with them and their drive to succeed has had a profound impact on the Australian economy, Australian society and on the nature of the country as a whole.
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Claudia and Rachid Ait-Touati (Murraylands / Riverland region) and Mary and Javier Centenera (Mallala region) Stories

Claudia and Rachid Ait-Touati Story

After feeling trapped in their home country of Holland, Claudia and Rachid decided it was time to realise Claudia’s childhood dream of moving to Australia. A migration agent advised them they would not be granted an Australian working visa. They didn’t have much money in the bank. If they couldn’t work they wouldn’t last long.   But they decided to try their luck. They packed five bags, their young family and headed to Australia on a tourist visa.

At first it didn’t look promising. Claudia’s family in regional Victoria were not helpful. A friend in Holland encouraged them to travel to Brisbane where they were offered work at a warehouse. However, without a working visa they were not able to start work. Things were looking bleak. Finally, a three-year working visa was granted. Through years of trying unsuccessfully to become residents in Australia through several different visa applications, Claudia and Rachid chanced their luck with a State Sponsorship in South Australia, and, within 2 to 3 weeks, it was approved.

A dream had been realised – rural life in the Murraylands and Riverland region, space for the kids, affordable housing, and most importantly, it provided a wonderful opportunity for Claudia and Rachid to realise a special dream that would benefit the local community.

 

Claudia Good resized

Australia's first care farm for people with dementia

 

careship Careship Coorong Ltd. is a charity which was established in 2011 by Claudia and Rachid Ait-Touati to promote care farming in Australia. Care farming is a form of ‘green care’ where people with care needs have socially valued roles on a working farm. The program is initiated by the farmer and therefore the focus is on the abilities of clients instead of the disabilities. Work will be adapted to the clients’ needs and interests and there is a friendly and relaxed atmosphere on the farm.

Careship Coorong Ltd. wants to promote care farming by establishing a pilot care farm for people with dementia. We will farm free-range snails which we will sell to local restaurants and caterers. The farm will be located in Coonalpyn, SA and is currently open every Monday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.  Careship operates as a social enterprise with the profits from the snails being returned into care programs and the farm project. 

To learn more about the Careship initiative go to: here

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Mary and Javier Centenera Story

Javier’s and Mary’s story begins in Sydney where they recently arrived from the Philippines. At the time, they were unaware that Mary was pregnant with their third child. For the first two years in Australia everything was going well. Javier had found work at a local engineering business, Mary was working as a bank teller and they moved into their new home. However this all changed when Joseph, their third child, turned two.

For the next 18 years their family fought hard to support Joseph. It mean't Javier had to work the night shift and Mary during the day. They were like ships passing in the night. In this episode, we see how an off-chance opportunity to purchase a farm from Javier’s brother in the Mallala region in South Australia, changed their lives. It gave them opportunities that they could have only dreamt about in Sydney.

 Mary Javier Centenera

 

Hunno Pappy' written by Mary Centenera

"Hunno Pappy" is a family's journey in life from the time their youngest son was diagnosed with autism at the age of two, up to his young adult life. The initial shock, then the acceptance and their willingness to learn and understand the complexity of autism. And how love, patience, perseverance and faith played a very big role in writing the book

To contact Mary Centenera: here

 

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Barossa and Mallala Region

The region is the heart of Australia's foremost wine making state, with more than 20% of Australia's wine made in the region, contributing $660 million to the regional economy and 5,000 full time jobs, which represented 24 per cent of the regional total. The region also produces significant quantities of cereal, fruit, vegetables, forest products, pigs and poultry.

The region has strong in-ward population migration and has a larger than average concentration of younger people and a slightly smaller than average share of persons aged between 15 to 64 years. Over 48 per cent of all persons aged 15 or over held some form of non-school qualification with participation in tertiary education increasing by 9 per cent in recent years.

The top five contributors to total employment in the region were manufacturing, retail trade, agriculture, forestry, health and community services and education and training. The region has three country hospitals - Tanunda, Angaston and Kapunda, and one District hospital in Gawler. There are two colleges of Technical and Further Education (Nuriootpa and Gawler) and the Roseworthy Campus of the University of Adelaide which is known for its agricultural research, veterinary school and equine hospital.

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Sadaf

Overseas Trained Doctors

Sadaf Seyedsalehi was inspired by her brother’s journey to Queensland where he was working as a registered general practitioner.

After completing her medical degree at one of Iran’s top medical universities, Sadaf practiced medicine for 17 months. But it wasn’t long before she was looking for new opportunities and adventures. Sadaf’s brother, Ashkan had described the amazing countryside, the relaxed and safe nature and opportunities for trained doctors and general health care workers in regional Queensland. Sadaf decided that she wanted to join her brother in Australia.

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WANT A JOB?
Here is one that might interest you...

  • GP Permanent Mackay (Health Workforce Queensland) A Maryborough based Medical Practice is looking for a Permanent General Practitioner for an immediate start. A minimum of 2 years experience is required.
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  • GP Permanent Gladstone (Health Workforce Queensland) This is a full time General Practice position for a medical practice based in a DWS location, ideally for an immediate start, although this is negotiable.
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  • Chief Executive Officer (Local Government) Applications Close: 30 June 2015 The CEO is key to the success of the organisation, leading the secretariat, the pivotal link between the LGA Board and the secretariat and playing a key role in establishing and utilising key relationships within other levels of government for the betterment of the Local Government sector, therefore Councils and communities across the State.
    View this article.

     

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